HIDDEN LORDSHIP

LordshipDike

Unless you grew up in Lordship during the 1950's thru the 1970's, you would not recognize or probably ever heard of the Duck Pond, Bloody River or Puck Pond in the swamps of Lordship. The most famous of these landmarks was the Duck Pond at the end of Walnut Street where many Lordship children and adults would spend winter afternoons skating or playing hockey. For those who were learning to skate and wanted to avoid the large crowds, the Bloody River was the place to go. The Bloody River received its name from the rust of the pipes that crossed the stream and discolored the water a rusty brown. The Bloody River ran parallel to Walnut Street and ran into the Duck Pond. For those of us that took our hockey seriously, the Puck Pond behind the St. Josephs Cemetery was the place to go. Larger and deeper than the Duck Pond, it was a more private and adventurous pond to play hockey. We would skate down the canal all the way to Business Wings, remove our skates, buy a soda from the soda machines and race all the way back to the pond. A less well known landmark, but an important one is the remains of the Lordship Dike which protected the Trolley Road from flooding and storms. Once extending to Bridgeport, part of it remains still in the Great Meadows on the south side of the Burma Road. The section to the right is all that remains in Lordship.

LordshipDyke1919

Lordship Dyke 1919

DuckPond

Duck Pond and Bloody River

PuckPond

Puck Pond

DuckPondboys

Duck Pond boys

BloodyRiver

1966 Bloody River

FromDike

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike1

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike2

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike3

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike4

Lordship Dike

LordshipDike5

Lordship Dike

TILDENS LANE

September 17, 1943 - TILDENS LANE PROVES TO BE A TOWN PUZZLE: Councilmen, At Sea, Defer Vacating It Until A Future Date: Tildens Lane, ancient highway in Lordship, stymied Stratford Town Council Monday night. Consequently an ordinance to abandon it was held over for consideration until the councilmen get their bearings. Tildens Lane was laid out by the town itself in 1670 to give access to the salt meadows. It has not been of any special service in latter years and much of it has been taken over by airport developments. Originally it was two rods wide, what is left seems to be less than half that size and a couple of hundred yards in length. The Defense Plant Corporation, subsidiary of the federal government, is building a huge hangar which will extend over the lane. It was stated in Council Monday that so far the hangar has not crossed the line of the highway although it is being constructed on both sides of the lane. Questions: Should Stratford just abandon the highway? Or should it charge something for the property? And what future complications may occur should the federal government turn the airport back to the former owners? - Note: Everything south of Frash Pond was considered Lordship at the time including the airport and Sikorsky plant.

LORDSHIP OUTWASH

LordshipOutwash

Lordship Outwash

LordshipOutwash

Lordship Outwash

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